Tag Archives: Marketing

WATCH: Case Study Webinar on Annual Report as Ultimate Marketing Tool

Happy summer, fellow festival folks! As some of us find time to relax, others look at summer to find new ways to market the exciting work we do.

To that end, some of you may have noticed the stellar Annual Report recently disseminated by the Seattle International Film Festival. For our July 2015 webinar, we asked Carl Spence talk us through why the Annual Report is such a solid tool for SIFF.

Case Study Webinar: Annual Report as Ultimate Marketing Tool

Annual reports are all too frequently dry summaries presented to boards, then buried on a website. SIFF’s 2014 Annual Report is a masterful example of using the year-end report as a full bore marketing tool, hitting all stakeholder groups and utilizing all the visual and technical mobile bells and whistles. This was also SIFF’s 40th Anniversary. Carl Spence walked us through the strategy for this Annual report, and how it compared to reports in previous years.

In case you missed it, here’s the archived video of the online presentation. (Note: due to technical difficulties, some portions are missing; we apologize, but we think there’s still enough “there” there to give you the gist.)

Other things we considered included:

  • How long did it take to create? Did you outsource or go DIY style?
  • What service/design/web developer did you use?
  • What went into your creative brief/creative direction?
  • What other examples inspired you?
  • How involved was the board in the process?
  • What advice would you give to festivals for collecting and maintaining the data and details that count if they are doing something like this?
  • How important was the anniversary to the process?
  • What has been the feedback?
  • How are you using this beyond the blast?

We hope you can join us at our next webinar. In the meantime, follow the Alliance on Facebook and Twitter for ongoing conversations…

Are You Deploying Effective Practices for Successful Audience Engagement?

Film Festivals, like arts organizations across the country, are experimenting with new ways to fulfill their missions and keep—if not expand—their audiences, at a time when consumers have more choices than ever before. The Wallace Foundation recently partnered with the American Alliance of Museums and six other nonprofit arts service organizations to share the principles for reaching and retaining new audiences in The Road to Results: Effective Practices for Building Arts Audiences, by Bob Harlow. Following are some excerpts from the report, courtesy of our AAM colleagues:

Recognizing When Change Is Needed.
Organizations saw a pattern of audience behavior that presented an opportunity or a challenge for their financial viability, artistic viability, or both. They recognized that change was necessary to seize this opportunity or overcome the challenge. In some cases, the urgency of the challenge or opportunity actually served the initiative by keeping it front and center, capturing and sustaining the attention of the entire organization over the years needed to build a following.

Determining What Kinds of Barriers Need to Be Removed.
Successful organizations identified the types of barriers impeding the target audience’s participation and shaped their strategies accordingly.

Thinking Through the Relationship.
Some case study organizations went so far as to spell out a vision of the relationship they wanted to cultivate with the new audience, including specific roles for the audience and themselves. By doing so, they gave their audience-building initiatives structure and a sense of purpose. Leaders and staff members understood how they wanted the audience to interact with their organization and developed programs to fulfill that vision.

Providing Multiple Ways In.
Staff expanded the ways people could access their organizations both literally and psychologically. Many organizations provided gateway experiences to acquaint newcomers with their activities. Others generated interest by making connections to things that their target audience already knew or by showing them different sides of their institutions.

Check out the full report: The Road to Results: Effective Practices for Building Arts Audiences.


Have a success story? We’d love to share it with the wider festival audience.
Drop us a line at info@ifpfestivalforum.org.

2014 IFP Festival Forum: Takeaways

Thanks for joining us in NYC for the 2014 IFP Festival Forum!

Welcome to the takeaway page…
In the coming days, we will continue to list follow-up documents and contacts here for the various panels, workshops and presenters.

Film Festival Programming: Best Practices

Click to download document:

IFPFF-programming-best-practices

Festival Budgets: Best Practices

Lesli Klainberg, Film Society of Lincoln Center | @lklainberg | @FilmLinc
♦ Colin Stanfield, New York Film Festival | @colinstanfield | @TheNYFF

Click for their presentation:

Budgeting Workshop image

Advocacy Tool Kit: Harmony Institute / Festival’s Impact

♦ Harmony Institute | Facebook | @HInstitute
StoryPilot
Debika Shome (presenter): email

Sign up to be a beta user at storypilot.org.

Everyone is on the Marketing Team

♦ Chris Holland | Atlanta Film FestivalFilm Festival Secrets | @ffsecrets
♦ Kristin McCracken | Hamptons International Film FestivalMcCrackHouse.com | @kmc1213

♦ Link to Social Media Handbook for Crowdfunding Filmmakers (c/o Seed & Spark)

Click for their presentation:

Everyone is on the Marketing Team

Festival Tools: Submissions Survey

♦ Jon Gann | DC Shorts | Film Festival Organizers (Facebook) | @jongann

Click for his presentation:

       Acquiring Festival Submissions IFPFF 2014


And of course, please make sure you follow IFP Festival Forum on Facebook and Twitter!

WATCH: Marketing Webinar

In case you missed it, we’ve made our recent webinar, entitled Everyone is on the Marketing Team (and other things your co-workers don’t want to hear), available on YouTube. Please enjoy this archived presentation, and make sure to RSVP for future events.

To learn more, please check out the IFP Festival Forum on Facebook and follow us on Twitter. Thanks!

Just a reminder: once you’ve watched the webinar (or if you were one of the original attendees), don’t forget to complete our survey here. We need your feedback in order to plan future events that will meet the needs of our growing community. Thanks!

IFP Festival Forum Webinar on 7/22: Everyone is on the Marketing Team…

The IFP Festival Forum was founded in an effort to connect members of the film festival community in a dynamic and engaged conversation around the work we do. In order for us to develop a tried-and-true set of best practices—allowing the smallest festival to be just as successful as the behemoth—we have to talk to each other and share our knowledge. Independent Film Week in September and the Art House Convergence in January are two places where these conversations happen, but how can we keep talking all year long?


We are pleased to announce the first in our series of monthly webinars around topics of interest to Forum members. The inaugural webinar, hosted by Chris Holland (Atlanta Film Festival), will uncover the mysteries of marketing your festival.

You are invited to join us online at 2pm ET / 11am PT on Tuesday, July 22, for an informative and interactive hour-long session entitled:

Everyone Is On The Marketing Team
(and other things your coworkers don’t want to hear)

In the language of film festivals: “If the house is packed, programming did a great job. If the seats are empty, marketing must have screwed up.”

Specialization and the compartmentalization of duties in any company — film festivals being no exception — disguise the fact that every decision you make about your event affects how the members of your audience see you. That means that every decision is a marketing decision, and every person who works for you must be aware of the marketing impact their actions have. Everyone, whether they want to admit it or not, is on the marketing team.

Want a sneak peek? Here are a few examples of tidbits we’ve learned:

* Programming is marketing. You must show movies that YOUR audience wants to see, and accept the fact that “good programming” may defy your own tastes and the tastes of others.

* Customer service is marketing. When it comes to new customers, trusted word of mouth has the power to override your other marketing efforts, so treat everyone well.

* Other areas traditionally not thought of as marketing that really are: budgeting, education, sponsorship…

You will also learn key concepts and ways to bring your entire staff onto the marketing bandwagon (and keep them happy once they are on board)!

The event is free to IFP Festival Forum members and friends, but space is limited. Please RSVP using EventBrite. Detailed instructions will be sent upon RSVP.

Chris Holland is the Operations and Marketing Director for the Atlanta Film Festival. He is also the author of Film Festival Secrets: A Handbook for Independent Filmmakers and a consultant on marketing and festival strategy for independent filmmakers around the world. Chris has worked on all sides of the festival circuit, including time spent at B-Side Entertainment, Slated, IFP, and the Austin Film Festival.  


Have an idea for a future webinar? Email kristin@mccrackhouse.com